Bonneville Seat Installation Guide

 

Text and Pictures by David Wambolt

Source: Rescued from Web Archive

 

If you want to know how to install a Bonneville front/rear seat in your 91-96 B-Body, read on:

 

 

Facts:

 

The 93-95 Bonneville Tan Leather seats are a prefect match, and they did not change the colors in these years. My rear seat is from a '93 and my fronts are from a '95 and they match perfectly.

 

The rear seat is about 1/2" smaller (width) than the original Caprice seat. It fits well with custom made brackets, and bending the rods on the lower seat. Overall, the fit is good, but expect to spend some time bending, and trial fitting the lower seat until you are satisfied with the results (snugness). I don't think I'm quite done yet, but it looks PERFECT, with the modifications I will describe as I enhance this web page.

 

When installing the front seats on manual slide rails (for me, my driver seat is power, passenger is manual), be very careful not to have your head in front of the seat rails looking under to see how the holes match up, and hit the seat adjustment lever. Needless to say, I just was not thinking, trying to finish the project while I had daylight, and it cleaned my clock. Hit me dead on my chin, chipped one of my teeth, cut me up pretty bad, but it really didn't hurt that bad, just a lot of gushing blood! 15 minutes later, I was back attacking my seat install project, and vow that I will never make that stupid mistake again! I was going to photograph the front seat install, but after my near death experience, I didn't have the extra time (daylight) to do that. There are other sites with that information, and all I will say is. Drivers side, drill 4 new holes, inwards of the old holes (about 3/8 from the existing holes), and then I notched between the holes on the left most rail to add the ease of install. Worked perfectly. On the passenger side with a manual seat rail, little drilling is necessary. Opened up the holes on the rail closest to the trans tunnel (notch inwards towards the other rail), and was able to attach the seat normally to the right most rail using the pre-welded on nuts, but on the inner rail, I had to use the old bolts, combined with a nut that is normally used to attach the seat rail to the floor pan. This worked out great with the holes already in the Bonneville seats (each seat has 8 holes (4 have welded nuts, 4 are just plain holes). Look at the images below, I will expand on this greatly in the up coming weeks:

 

End Result: WOOHOO!!! Compared to those bulletproof 9C1 seats, there is no comparison.. even the Impala guys at work were drooling over my new seats... hehe... Comfy and very supportive... makes it feel like an entirely different car! I do believe I have the first B-Body that is converted entirely over to the Bonneville Leather Seats... so this should be known as the "Whammy Seat Mod". :)

 

If you purchase a Bonneville front seat similar to mine, with the built in console, and it is power, the power controls are located on the front/left side of the seat. This means, if you have manual seats, you would simply need to purchase a Caprice power seat rail (or if you can metal fab, modify the Bonneville Power Seat Rail and weld new brackets to the seat rail -possibly cutting up the ones from the caprice manual rail and re-welding them to the Bonneville rail-), run two wires from under the dash (power/ground) with a 25amp fuse (I prefer to use of MINI-FUSE's, in an inline holder). That would give you a 6 way power seat without having to run the wires up to the door, buy the new switch, and pigtails, tear the door panel off, etc. So if you are looking for an easier way to add a power drivers seat to your car, this is the way to go. Just make sure if you attempt to modify the floor rail, you spend a good amount of time making sure that when you are done, it is very sturdy and doesn't stand the risk of breaking. Normal Disclaimers apply. :)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above: You will notice the custom brackets I made. I simply drilled the two holes, bent that metal rod, so that it formed a U shaped bracket (it helps to bend it so far, where the two ends cross over, so that it holds itself against the bolt as you tighten it down). This location is PERFECT and allows adjustment of the rear seat both up and down, and left and right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above: The top left picture shows 4 brackets at the bottom of the seat, and there are two at the top that engage the brackets shown in pictures 1 and 2. It is necessary to bend the upper brackets on the seat inwards so that it holds the seat tighter to the rear deck when installed. I found it easiest to install the rear of the seat first on the upper brackets, but keep the seat up about an inch or so from the rear deck. Install the bolts where the seat belts attach at the bottom of the seat on the two opposite ends of the seat. Now, slide the seat down a little and tighten up both bolts. When you do this, it will bend the lower brackets some (top right, picture 2), loosen them up, slide the seat down more, and do it again.. and you will eventually have the bracket bent perfectly. I did no bending by hand with these brackets. The two center brackets, once the seat was finally installed, I just took my hammer, and pounded them down to the contour of the floor pan (you could bend them and attach them to where the inner seat belts attach), and I did the same with the two outer brackets when they were bolted on at the seat belts. I used care not to dent my floor pan, and the end result was a rear seat that fit very well. Please note that if you install this in a tan interior car, you might get a little bit of that white backing shown in the rear deck area (look closely at the white border around the entire seat). I used some brown shoe polish (bottom, picture 3) to go along the top edge of the seat to change the color from white to brown, so that even if it does show just a tad, its not even noticeable and looks totally stock.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above: The two pictures show the insulation back in place, covering the homemade brackets. I also cut in half an old tan floor mat and shoved it under the trim as shown. This hides any insulation from the rear seat not being perfectly contoured to the rear trim, as the Caprice seat was. Once this was done, you can't see anything but some tan carpet when looking through the small side window and looks totally stock. Believe me, I am always one to complain of non-perfect installations, and this looks great. <g>

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above: Due to the fact that the Bonneville seat does not have the notch/recess for the trans tunnel, you need to raise the level of the carpet up a bit. I didn't plan for this, so I didn't have some carpet padding on hand to do this the correct way. I used some cardboard instead, but will be changing it out in the next couple weeks to carpet padding. You could use just about anything, but it needs to be about an 1 1/2" thick and about 14-16 inches long. Go too high, or too long, and your carpet will not fit correctly.   This is really just to help keep the front of the seat from rocking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above: Though not pretty and not perfect, you need to bend the lower seat attaching rod (and its not that easy either, I used the claw of a hammer to grab the rod and bend it). The thing you need to remember is, the brackets on the floor pan area bout 2 inches more inwards than the Bonneville's. This means, you need to bend the rods inwards (towards each other), and forward to help push the seat under the back of the rear seat. I am still working on this to keep the seat from wanting to rock forward when sitting on the very tip of the seat, but for the most part, it looks stock when installed, and doesn't move when you sit in it normally. Some patience and work will surely net you a secure seat and you can always shim the rear of the seat with carpet padding to give it a tighter fit with the floor pan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above: My favorite picture (left), that really shows off the real world look of the seats. The right picture shows the built in console on this seat (45/45 buckets were also available).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above: Left picture shows the rear seat, with console and cup holders. On my rear seat, the arm rest actually opens, and it has two storage bins in there too! Talk about some major storage, with cup holders to boot. If you notice the black area in the rear seat, that actually opens to provide pass through to the trunk. I didn't feel like adding a pass through to my spare-tire, so I left my cutoff tool in my toolbox. :) You have a lot more options with this rear console, for electronic gadgets, etc. I was thinking of adding some Wig-Wag/Traffic Backer Controls and Strobe Controls to keep the rear seat occupants busy. Front seats with the console and cup holder, nothing no one hasn't seen already.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above: Picture of the seats from the rear of the car, and they are very noticeable. Back of the front seats, and a picture of my junk behind the driver seat (I swear it is work related).

 

I will be adding a few more pictures, in the next few days to show people the non-stock fixes I have made during the seat installation.

 

Special Thanks to: Kelly "Ghostwheel" Rosato and Elie Chouinard for providing me with the seats and/or information to obtain them!  Thanks guys!

 

David Wambolt
Copyright 1998

 


 

Mike's Bonneville Bucket Seat HQ

Your information center for literally the best "seat of the pants" Impala Mod!

left view of the 12 way seats rear view of the 12-way seats
Pictures of the 12-way seats in my car. The 6-ways look almost identical.
 
Synopsis: Replace the front "bucket" seats in the 94-96 Impala SS with those from a '93-95 Bonneville with AS6 or AL7 trim package for greatly improved look, comfort and support.

Background Information: It was at the 1997 International Auto Show in Detroit that I got my first taste of the ultimate in GM production bucket seats. While the Bonny seats are still technically 45/45 split bench seats like those in the stock Impala, they are more luxurious and at the same time much more supportive. From that day, it became my quest to see if I could adapt a set of these to my 96 Impala SS. I started by making several trips and phone calls to the local Poncho dealer. In my research, I found that the '93-95 Bonneville SSE and SSEi offered virtually identical seats in leather, with gray or beige being the only color options. The gray leather for these 3 years is a perfect match to the Imapla SS interior. In 1996 and subsequent years, the light gray option was replaced by a medium gray. There are actually two option codes for these seats, the AS6 seats are a 6 way design and like our Impala's came with either power driver and manual passenger or power on both sides. The top of the line seats (so-called 12-way) are option code AL7 and include power recline, 3 different power lumbar supports and power adjustable side bolsters in addition to the standard positioning functions. Also, the headrest on the AL7 seats tilts manually, whereas the AS6 headrests do not tilt at all. I have installed both types.

Acknowledgements: Since I first reported on this mod in May of 1997, a number of others have done the same. I have to thank Scott Knight for contributing most of the digital images in the following installation instructions, that Mavica rules. Also thanks a million to Mike Mullin for turning me on to the sources for both sets of AL7 seats I bought. Mike currently has my AS6 seats in his car. I met Troy Dukes at The Gathering and he has installed 12-ways in his 9C1. His write up is at the bottom of the page . Larry Law, Dave Zeckhausen and Mitch Posner have all done this mod too. Dave Zechhausens comments on his install at the bottom of the page.  Allan Saltman also provided some very helpful feed back that has been incorporated into this site. Thanks to all of these folks have contributed to the following installation details. Enjoy!

Locating Seats:The first set of seats I located by calling a local a local bone yard who found a set of 6 ways on their network... for $350. I was nervous about coughing up these bucks sight unseen, so I talked the guy who found them into telling me where they were. It turns out that they were in Grand Rapids, about 100 miles from where I live. Sooo... I packed up the wife and kids in the minivan and headed west, under the auspices of going to the beach in Holland, MI on the big lake. [A few miles out I mentioned that I wanted to stop and check the seats out ;-)]. The seats were in a badly wrecked SSE and were a real mess due to exposure to the weather, broken glass, etc, but the color match was perfect. Because of their condition, I talked the guy down to $160+tax for the set. To make a long story short, I wound up back in Canton with the seats (I did get the kids to the beach, btw)

The two sets of 12 ways were located by fellow MISSLer Mike Mullin, who is apparently a regular at several local used parts places. Since he was not interested in wiring in the 12-ways he turned me on to them for rights to my original set. I bought a set out of a '95 from Schrams in Waterford, Michigan and a set out a '93 at DIX in Taylor, Michigan. I paid around $200/pair for these. The harness and switchpod was had for between $50-$65. The switchpod new is about $115 discounted from GM.

Bottom line is that your best bet it to hook up with the guy behind the counter at a large local boneyard that specializes in late model wrecks and visit often with a box of doughnuts under your arm. When a set comes up, go in and scrutinize them, find out what is wrong with them and haggle.

Installing the 6-way (AS6 option code) Bonneville Bucket seats in an Impala SS

    Installation Overview and Tips:
  • You will be using the Impala floor rail/motor assembly, so the seat power will be the same as the original ones, even if the passenger side Bonny seat was manual.
  • You can either use the stock Impala seat controllers in the door (no electrical work required) or the Bonneville seat switches on the front edge of the seat (12 V must be run to the seat).
  • The stock seats are removed and holes are drilled in the floor rail to match the Bonneville seat mounting holes.
  • The Bonny seats are tested and bolted in.

The standard leather seats are a 6-way design and like our Impala's came with either power driver and manual passenger or power on both sides. Actually, I have only seen the former, but am told that the dual power seats are also available.

Advantages: More supportive, comfortable and sporty looking seats that are a perfect match for the interior of the Impala SS. Allows you to store the stock seats for future value.

Disadvantages: These seats can be hard to find and locator services usually charge an arm and a leg for a set in good condition. You lose the SS stitching in the headrest.

Parts Required: The '93 - '95 Bonneville SSE and SSEi offered virtually identical seats in leather, with gray or beige being the only color options. The option code is AS6. From all of the cars I looked 3, '94 and '95) the gray leather is a perfect match. You can go one better if you can locate a set of these with adjustable lumbar supports (option code AL7) although installation will not be as trivial as that described below due to the extensive wiring involved.

Tools Required: 13mm socket, drill with 5/16" bit.

Procedure: This swap takes less than four hours, if you are careful. First, take the stock seats out. Having done it both ways, I found it easier to first remove the seats from the floor rails, then remove the floor rails (this is contrary to the procedure outlined in the FSM). As Dave Zeckhausen points out, if you are not interested in using the front edge controls that are on the Bonny seat, then no wiring is required at all and it is easier to just leave the floor rails in the car to do the following modifications. Raise and tilt the front all the way up to remove the front ones, and then raise the rear to get the back ones. Recline seat back all the way back and have someone help you remove through the rear door. Measure the distance between the bolt holes in the Bonny seats and mark and drill the new holes in the top of the Impala floor rails. Drill a 11/32" hole in each corner, 5/8" (center-to-center) next to each existing hole. Actually, any drill bit from 5/16" to 3/8" will work. This will make the new holes 1-1/4" closer to each other side-to-side, compared with stock. The front-to-back distance was the same on the Bonneville and the SS. If you wish, the rear holes can be elongated with a file like the stock ones (thanks to Dave Zeckhausen for this suggestion). Bolt the Bonneville seats onto the Impala floor rails. The stock electrical connector plugs right into the Bonny seats and provides full control of the seat positioning. If you want to use the adjusters on the front edge of the Bonny seats, then you will need to run 12 volts back to the seat harness ala the 12way install


Above:Picture of the Impala floor rail assembly showing location of new holes to match up with the nuts in the Bonny seats. Below: Close-ups of the drilling procedure and the final bolted-in assembly.







 

Installing the 12-way (AL7 option code) Bonneville Bucket Seats

 

    Installation Overview and Tips:
  • You will be using the Impala floor rail/motor assembly, all other hardware comes from the Bonneville seats.
  • Make sure you get the complete inter-seat harness and switch pad from the Bonneville!
  • Obtain copies of the relevant Bonneville FSM pages for the model year for your seats.
  • In a place with plenty of room, lay the seats out, connect the wiring and attach to 12 volts for testing.
  • The stock seats are removed and holes are drilled in the floor rail to match the Bonneville seat mounting holes.
  • The interseat harness is run under the carpet between the seats and switchpad and connected to power and ground.
  • The switch controller is mounted.
  • The Bonny seats are tested and bolted in.

Advantages: More supportive, comfortable and sporty looking seats that are a perfect match for the interior of the Impala SS. Lumbar supports and adjustable side bolsters do wonders for your back on those long trips. Allows you to store the stock seats for future value.

Disadvantages: These seats can be hard to find and locator services usually charge an arm and a leg for a set in good condition. The 12-way seats themselves are heavier (36# right and 35# left) than the stock Impala (29# each side). You lose the SS stitching in the headrest.

Parts Required: The '93 - '95 Bonneville SSE and SSEi offered virtually identical seats in leather, with gray or beige being the only color options. The option code is AL7. For all three model years the gray leather is a perfect match to the Impala SS interior. You will need the seats, the inter-seat wiring harness and the switch pod from the center console. It is also helpful to obtain photocopies of the seat wiring schematics from the proper Bonneville model year factory service manual. Here are the part numbers for the black door inserts to eliminate the stock seat switches:

Tools Required: 13mm socket, drill with 5/16" bit, soldering iron.

Procedure: This swap takes several hours. First, I recommend laying out the Bonneville seats, switch pod and wiring harness on the floor. If your harness is the same as the two I have seen, you can unwrap it and remove most of the wires that are not connected to the seats. This both reduces the bulk of the harness and makes it easier to verify the routing of the wires. Supply 12 volts to the orange (or orange and black) wires going to both sides of the harness (3 wires total), and to the small gray wire going to the switch pod connector (switch pod illuminator). Oddly enough, the color schemes on the wires from the '93 and '95 Bonny seats were slightly different. Here is where photocopies of the appropriate Bonny FSM will be invaluable. Mate all the connectors and air hoses and verify the proper operation of the seats.

Next, take the stock seats out. Having done it both ways, I found it easier to first remove the seats from the floor rails, then remove the floor rails (this is contrary to the procedure outlined in the FSM). Raise and tilt the front all the way up to get remove the front ones, and then raise the rear to get the back ones. Recline seat back all the way back and have someone help you remove through the rear door. Then remove the floor rails by unscrewing the trim pieces and unbolting them from the floor. Measure the distance between the bolt holes and mark and drill the new holes (as shown above) in the top of the Impala floor rails. Drill a 5/16" hole in each corner, 5/8" (center-to-center) next to each existing hole. This will make the new holes 1-1/4" closer to each other side-to-side, compared with stock. The front-to-back distance was the same on the Bonneville and the SS. Make sure you check that these match up with the bonny seats before proceeding.

Install the wiring harness. This is properly done by peeling back the carpet after removal of the seats and center console. Unplug the fuse for the power seats. Lay out the harness and solder the orange or orange/black wires onto the power line (also orange/black) leading to the door switches near the hood release lever and connect all the black wires to a solid ground. The Bonny seats have an extra motor and the air bladder pump/distribution attached directly to the seats, so the motor harness needs to be swapped from the Bonneville floor rails to the Impala floor rails.




 

Re-lay the carpet and bring the connectors through the original holes. Then bolt the modified Impala floor rails to the floor, but don't fully tighten them down yet. Tuck the original seat connectors under the carpet. Set the Bonneville seats onto the floor rails, make all the electrical connections, reinstall the fuse and test the operation of the seats. The gray wire in the bonny harness is for the lighting the switchpod. You can tap off of the gray wire that lights the shift indicator (if installing in a '96 Impala). Once you have verified correct operation, bolt the seats to the floor rails and tighten down the floor rails. Before you reinstall the console, decide where you want to put the switch pod (see below)

The seats come with a 9 button switch pad, comprised of 9 two-way toggle buttons and associated switches, some red LEDs to illuminate the L/R seat selector and mini bulbs with orange condoms with light pipes to illuminate the buttons. I had originally put the switch pod in the console bin. It fits in there nicely and a 1" hole in the front of the bin allows for the switch pod connectors to pass into the open space behind the shifter. This location works for any model year Impala. I had it that way for about a half a day, until I saw what Scott Knight had done. He had the cajones to take a die grinder to his console insert and install the swithes just forward of the shifter (of course this location only works for Impala's with floor shifters). It looked so good, that I immediately got to work on my own console. The location is perfect and after about 8 hours of cutting, gluing, filling, sanding and painting with black wrinkle paint, it looks like the factory put them there (Notice Ed Runnions's great Caddy Shifter Mod too!)

While I was at it, I filled the depression in the rear of the console insert with bondo and relocated the impala emblem there.

Of course, this renders the stock seat switches useless and I wanted to eliminate these from the door. I started looking for gray switch inserts with window but no seat switches but unfortunately, GM only made gray door inserts for the Impala and the manual drivers side seat was not available on the Impala. Dal Slabaugh at Lambert Buick looked into this for me and was only able to find woodgrained inserts that had the requisite window switches w/o seat controls. At one of the 1998 MISSL meetings, I was checking out Steve Walker's very nice slammed and shaved '91 Caprice and behold! black inserts that looked like they would do. I called Dal and the bloodhound in him got to work. Shortly thereafter, I came home from work and sitting on my doorstep was the exact set-up I needed! The drivers side panel has four switches, one for each window (and no lock-out switch) and the passenger side has a single switch. I went straight to the garage and put them in. I think they look better than the gray myself.

Another alternative to the above is to install separate two-position toggle switches to control the functions that the door switches don't (three for the lumbar, one for the side bolsters and one for the recline). These could be placed on the side of the console or anywhere convienent. You are on your own for the wiring on this one, however .



 

Dave Zeckhausen's comments on the 6-way seat install

Mike,

You can add me to the legion of folks who did the Bonny seat mod. I installed the wiring for Larry Law's 12-ways and then I installed the 6-ways in my own car. I think those are the seats that you went and checked out for Mitch Posner! If so, then thanks! Once a little goo was cleaned off they were almost perfect.

Couple of quick suggestions for your web page. On the 6-way seats, the seat rail does not need to come out of the car. In fact, drilling the holes in the seat rails is easier when the rail is left bolted down inside the car. Any metal filings can be cleaned up with a shop vac or a magnet.

Your web page mentions an electrical connection to the 6-way seats. In fact, the 6-way seats drop right onto the stock rails and there are no electrical connections. I suspect that you wrote this up AFTER you did the 12-way installation and you had wiring on the brain. Or, perhaps, it's because you removed the seat rails from the car and then when you put them back, you had to reattach the electrical connector. As I mentioned above, this is an unnecessary step.

I found it easier to mount the seats to the rails by mimicking the stock holes with the new holes that were drilled closer together. In other words, the front holes were slightly larger than 5/16" and the rear holes were shaped with a couple of files (rattail and triangle) to match the rectangular opening of the stock Impala rear holes. That allows you to attach the front bolts first, then, any slop in the manufacturing tolerance of the seat is taken up by the rear slots. I did my first seat by just drilling the four 5/6" holes as you described. Because the seat was not perfectly built (or perhaps my measurements were slightly off) the last bolt did not want to go in straight.

The shaping of the rear holes with a file adds about 10 minutes per side to the installation. But leaving the seat rails in place inside the car gives you more than that amount of time back. Thought you would be interested.

Thanks again for going to the junkyard to check out the seats that ultimately became mine.

Dave (written 9/7/98) 1


Parts - Bonneville AL7 (12 way) seats, seat tracks, wiring harness, and console switch panel. Trim code 14 is light gray and matches my '95 gray interior.

Recipient - Caprice with power driver bucket or power driver split bench. If all manual, you could do this with a Caprice power seat track for driver or both sides. I believe the bolts and nuts attaching the track to the floor are 13mm.

Remove the Caprice front seats. For the driver side, run the seat full up and back and remove the rear bolts attaching the seat to the track. Run the seat full forward and remove the two front bolts. The seat should lift off of the seat track.

Remove the two front and four rear nuts, unconnect the body harness to motor wiring harness connector, and remove the seat track.

If the Bonneville seats still have the power track attached, mark and unconnect the motor wiring harness connectors (4 motor connectors). Mark and remove the motor wiring harness connector from the Caprice seat track (3 motor connectors) and plug this into the Bonneville seat track. The motor in the middle of the seat bottom is the recline motor - don't connect here, connect to the three motors on the side of the track. You can then drop the seat in the car, connect the body harness connector to move the seat around to remove it from the Pontiac tracks. You'll also see that the only basic difference in the two tracks is the track to floor pan mounts.

After you've separated both seats from tracks, you'll need to redrill the Caprice seat track rails to match the Pontiac welded nut holes in the seat bottom frame. After reattaching the Pontiac motor harness to the Caprice seat track and attaching the Pontiac seat to the Caprice seat track, you're ready to bolt the seat in the car - but wait.

Removing the passenger side is very basic if it's manual as mine was. Unbolt from floor and seperate seat and track outside the car. To use the Caprice manual track on the Bonneville seat takes patience and using the outside bolt holes on each seat side. One side won't match up with the welded nuts. You'll have to 'adjust' the manual seat lever by bending it a bit. If it's a power pass. seat, it should be a repeat of the driver seat.

While the seats are out, you should have a slit in the carpet under each seat. Pull the door sill plates, work the carpet around, and run the wiring harness under the carpet. It helps to plug the rat's nest of wiring together outside the car to identify left and right. Basically you have left seat leads, switch panel leads, and right seat leads. The odd black tube with the single gray round connector is for the inflatable lumbar supports. The black canister under the right seat is the inflator motor.

After you've laid the harness and provided new wiring for power and ground, the seats can be installed. I'd wait to bolt the driver seat down until verifying all functions work correctly.

Wiring - do not attempt to connect the Caprice body harness connector into the Pontiac switch box connectors under the front of the left seat. The connector that physically fits together doesn't fit electrically. I didn't use the Caprice connector and the door switch. I'm using the Pontiac switch that will control either seat. You'll see an orange/black stripe wire (hot) and a black wire (ground) terminating in a two position connector at the black box. Apply power and ground appropriately to the switch box. There will another set of orange/black and black wires in the bundle to send power and ground to the pass. seat. All other connectors from the switch box are output to control left and right seat functions.

There is a single gray wire that provides illumination to the switch panel. It's orange illumination, but blue bulb caps should fix that. I'll probably build/scrounge an appropriate console and mount the switchpad there. I'm also considering using a cell phone stalk to mount the switchpad on. There is a smaller guage orange wire that gets power - without connecting it, the power lumbar functions don't work. There is a third black wire that goes to ground.

 

 
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